“The Story Behind the Still: The Cabbie” (Vincent Laforet on Vimeo)

The Story Beyond The Still: The Cabbie from Vincent Laforet on Vimeo.

I’ve decided to include a post on this video that I came across on Vimeo – it intrigued me for several reasons, and as a result I’d like to help promote it:

  • The video / short film is well made and engaging, and at the end leaves you wanting more, but just a little creepy also …
  • Vincent Laforet is roughly the same age as me, but in an entirely different career, and half way round the world from me (you can read his bio here)
  • I’m also interested in DSLR photography, but only on an amateur level (sadly not having the time to let this hobby develop yet … no pun intended)
  • The video is the initial step in a social network / crowdsourcing style contest, not too dissimilar to the exercise you might have done at school, where everyone wrote a different chapter to a book in their English class … in this case Vincent has filmed the first chapter in a film and contestants will submit subsequent chapters starting where the last one finished (given the ending to “The Cabbie”, it will be interesting to see where the contestants and judges take it next)

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How developments in social media might impact internal corporate communications

Internal corporate communications often put a positive spin on news stories, and often include only stories which portray the organization in a positive light and highlight recent success stories. Reasons for this can include thee organization’s leadership wanting to motivate staff, emphasise strategy, and direct the development of the corporate culture, as well as possibly also highlighting successful leadership.

As such, the style of presentation and choice of content can include an element of bias, and in some cases might even be factually inaccurate or misleading (eg, if the leadership feels that this can be in the best interests of the organization, or if the leadership is dictating the internal communications in order to justify it’s own existence or overstate its own performance). This is natural – in any communications or discussion, most people tend to put a positive spin on their own performance.

Recent technological developments, in particular Web2.0/Social Media, are however limiting the effectiveness of what can essentially be ‘corporate propaganda‘.

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Google Wave – the future of communications, or just another social media tool?

Google_Wave_logoYou’ve heard of Facebook and Twitter – next up is Google Wave. I recently received an invite to join Google Wave, Google’s new social media/collaboration tool.  Since it is still in a limited preview phase, the only way to join Google Wave is via such invites (read on if you are interested in getting an invite – I have three to give away). I’ve now had some time to play with it, and thought I’d add my thoughts to the growing number of reviewers and critics.

According to the Google Wave ‘About’ page:

Google Wave is an online tool for real-time communication and collaboration. A wave can be both a conversation and a document where people can discuss and work together using richly formatted text, photos, videos, maps, and more.

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Starting a blog – the basics

iStock_000001719411XSmallI’ve had a number of people tell me that what I’ve told them about my early blogging experiences has encouraged them to consider also starting a blog, and for that reason, and now that I am past my first 100 days as a blogger, I thought that I would summarize how to start a blog, based on my own experiences.

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The best ways to keep informed of new blog posts

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So, you like what you see, but the internet is simply too large and you have too little time to keep coming back to see what’s new (if anything)?

There are better ways to follow blog postings than to have to keep re-visiting the blog’s website address:

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Now that’s incredible – WordPress blog statistics for July 2009

You can read the statistics here.  I’ve copied a selection of them here (per another ‘Matt’ on wordpress.com) so that I can comment on them:

Here are July’s stats:

  • 394,609 blogs were created.
  • 5,666,839 posts were published.
  • 418,946 new users joined.
  • 6,594,795 file uploads.
  • 3,762 gigabytes of new files.
  • 839 terabytes of content transferred from our datacenters.
  • 7,890,707 comments.
  • 6,681,646 logins.
  • 1,253,217,900 pageviews on WordPress.com, and another 1,289,187,116 on self-hosted blogs (2,542,405,016
    total across all WordPress blogs we track).
  • 2,146,576 active blogs where “active” means they got a human visitor.
  • 1,419,364,230 words.

Some amazing figures here.  Over 2 million ACTIVE blogs.  Wow. Over 2.5 billion pageviews in a month.  Astounding.

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Traffic! Already?!

I’ve barely begun to build the site, and I’ve just seen that I’ve already got traffic.  This puts me under some pressure to provide some half/decent content.  I apologize if you arrived and were disappointed to find things like “test” and “Hello world!” (from WordPress), and half completed pages …

More will follow later – first I have to think of a theme.  Furthermore, this blog is not my top priority (in fact it comes quite low down the list after family, work, sleep, …).