Links to “Everything is a remix”, by Kirby Ferguson

For a while I’ve been following Kirby Ferguson’s excellent short, 4-part series Everything is a remix. The first part (above) is over two years old now; the last part was completed earlier this year (Kirby’s now moved onto other topics, including “This is not a conspiracy theory“). “Everything is a remix” is beautifully curated/produced, and I wanted to share that further. See below for parts 2 to 4.

Continue reading

Where do ideas come from?

Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/Tommydickson

I’ve been thinking about this quite a lot recently. In a way, it is the ‘holy grail’ of innovation, one that many innovation books are trying to answer, or help you with – if you can understand where ideas come from, and refine that, so you get better ideas more often, then one can win notoriety/fame and fortune.

As with many things however, it’s just not that easy. Coming up with ‘good ideas’ is an art. Sometimes we think they ‘pop’ into our heads, and we don’t quite know how one minute we had no idea, and the next we are empowered by a thought that we want to develop and share with others.

From reading around on this, and thinking about it, one clear message appears to come out – ideas are often (but not exclusively) not things that come quickly, from a single person in a single moment (as many people believe, in a sudden ‘Eureka’ moment, or having an apple fall on your head), but rather ‘grow’ over a period of time from a network (it’s only the ‘realization/awareness’ of the idea, the ‘connecting of the dots’, that appears sudden).

Continue reading

Mastering the “killer chart” to ‘wow’ your audience

Hans Rosling, using Gapminder to ‘wow’ audiences with his ability to cross-reference UN and similar data sources

As a practicioner of ‘due diligence’ I consider one of the key skills to be seeing through numbers/data and finding a way to present, in a very succinct manner, a key trend/issue. There are several key elements to this:

  • the ability to hypothesise the outcome, and then consequently choose and develop the appropriate data sets and presentation format (without random trial and error, which is too slow);
  • analyzing the data to determine key trends, even when the data may not appear to exhibit trends; and
  • the communication of the finding in a compelling, interesting and succinct manner.

Continue reading

Have you “let yourself down” recently? Have courage, and use it to your benefit!

iStock_000005568444XSmall

While away on a business trip recently (in UK), I watched an episode of “Masterchef: the Professionals”, a television show where four chefs compete to qualify for later stages in a competition which judges their culinary skills. Very often the participants stated “I really let myself down” after hearing criticism of their efforts.

I was intrigued by the frequency that I heard this, and wondered why this should be the case.

Continue reading