Curious about … Birth rates, and the demographic-economic paradox

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In the last few weeks I’ve heard two very contrasting interpretations of forecast birth rates. Both are largely based on the same facts, however with somewhat contrasting perspectives.

  1. The first interpretation, concerns itself with declining birth rates in the major, ‘developed’ economies, asking the question, if populations aren’t growing sufficiently (and in some cases, like Germany, aren’t even replacing themselves), how will future economic growth expectations be met?
  2. The second interpretation concerns itself with massive recent (ie, over the last 100 years) global population growth, and the potential consequences for earth’s finite resources (water, food, fuel, metals, etc.).

I’ve read around these concepts on the internet and set out, in the remainder of this blog post, some thoughts on what I’ve found, including the demographic-economic paradox,  the demographic transition, sub-replacement fertility rates, and suggestions of the ‘tabu’ of discussing population growth.

ps. The title of this post is made in hommage to The Curiosity Chronicles, a Tumblr blog by Paul Bennett, Managing Partner and Chief Creative Officer of IDEO. I encourage you to take a look at his posts, if you’ve not seen them yet.

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7 things that could define the core of an ‘alternative’ MBA

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Both during, and since my MBA there is a topic that has been eating away at me – was there anything missing, or could the experience have been improved by the inclusion of other study topics? Don’t get me wrong, I thought my MBA was excellent, but I’m always looking to see how things might be further improved.

Most MBAs deliver a mixture of core material (finance, economics, accounting, strategy, etc.) and electives (optional topics that are either more niche or are perhaps addressed in greater detail, often relating to a topic that the school is known for being strong at). The elective topics nevertheless tend to revolve around academic content/theory, with case studies to provide a bridge to reality.

Could other topics, which are perhaps not considered as classical MBA topics, be useful additions to an MBA?

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